Citizenship and Naturalization

Naturalization is the process by which foreign nationals can receive United States citizenship.  The individual seeking naturalization must meet certain basic requirements in order to be eligible for U.S. citizenship:

  • Be 18 years of age or older at the time of filing the naturalization application (subject to certain exceptions).
  • Have continuous residence in the United States as a lawful permanent resident for at least five (5) years (in most cases; the requirement is three (3) years if married to a U.S. citizen).
  • Reside for at least three (3) months in the state where the application is filed.
  • Meet physical presence requirements.
  • Maintain continuous residence in the United States from the date of filing the naturalization application to admission to citizenship.
  • Demonstrate fluency in communicating in the English language, though there are a limited number of people who can have this requirement waived.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of U.S. government and history, unless you qualify for a medical waiver.
  • Be of good moral character.

Applicants may be held to more or less restrictive standards depending on their background.  An absence from the United States of six (6) months or more could constitute disruption of continuity of residence.

Certain people automatically qualify to be citizens by operation of law primarily based on their parents’ immigration status. This is a rare but vital form of relief for persons in removal proceedings, particularly those with criminal convictions.

Long Island Immigration Attorney Eric Horn has been navigating through the highly specialized field of U.S. Immigration Law and will be happy to assist you. Contact the Law Office of Eric Horn, PC at (631) 435-7900 or contact him online to schedule a consultation.